Carcase Material

PLYWOOD

Plywood is a sheet material manufactured from thin layers or "plies" of wood veneer that are glued together with adjacent layers having their wood grain rotated up to 90 degrees to one another. It is an engineered wood from the family of manufactured boards which includes medium-density fibreboard (MDF) and particle board (chipboard).

All plywoods bind resin and wood fibre sheets (cellulose cells are long, strong and thin) to form a composite material. This alternation of the grain is called cross-graining and has several important benefits.

Benefits
  • It reduces the tendency of wood to split when nailed at the edges
  • It reduces expansion and shrinkage, providing improved dimensional stability
  • It makes the strength of the panel consistent across all directions.
  • There are usually an odd number of plies, so that the sheet is balanced — this reduces warping. Because plywood is bonded with grains running against one another and with an odd number of composite parts, it is very hard to bend it perpendicular to the grain direction of the surface ply.
MDF

Medium-density fibreboard (MDF) is an engineered wood product made by breaking down hardwood or softwood residuals into wood fibres, often in a defibrator, combining it with wax and a resin binder, and forming panels by applying high temperature and pressure. MDF is generally denser than plywood. It is made up of seperated fibres, but can be used as a building material similar in application to plywood. It is stronger and much denser than particle board.

MDF does not contain knots or rings, making it more uniform than natural woods during cutting and in service. Typical MDF has a hard, flat, smooth surface that makes it ideal for veneering, as there is no underlying grain to telegraph through the thin veneer as with plywood.

Like natural wood, MDF may split when woodscrews are installed without pilot holes.

VENEERED MDF

It provides of the advantages of MDF with a decorative wood veneer surface layer.

In modern construction, spurred by the high costs of hardwoods, manufacturers have been adopting this approach to achieve a high quality finishing wrap covering over a standard MDF board. Making veneered MDF is a complex procedure, which involves taking an extremely thin slice of hardwood (approx 1-2mm thick) and then through high pressure and stretching methods wrapping them around the profiled MDF boards. This is only possible with very simple profiles because otherwise when the thin wood layer has dried out, it will break at the point of bends and angles.

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